Case 88

Stephen Hilder

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Case 88

Stephen Hilder

Accidents are to be expected in skydiving. It is, after all, an extreme sport. Over 99% of people who jump out of an aeroplane will do it just once, attached to an instructor.

Those people are unlikely to come to any harm. They’re strapped to a professional who has performed thousands of jumps and who makes all the decisions. For the majority of participants, skydiving is a once-in-a-lifetime thrill, just a tick on a bucket list. They never do it again.

For the tiny fraction who go on to jump solo, skydiving becomes more than just a thrill. It is an obsession, a lifestyle, something they are – rather than merely something they do.

As those starting out get used to the elements of the sport – freefall, canopy flight, and landing, they are bound to experience scrapes and bruises, perhaps even a broken bone or two. Skydivers do what they can to minimise risks. They look out for each other – check their own gear and that of the people they are jumping with, looking out for anything amiss: frayed loops that may not hold a closing pin in properly, flaps that have become untucked, webbing that is wearing out.

This close-knit community is built on equal parts adrenaline and trust.

Accidents are to be expected in skydiving, but deaths are rare. Most skydivers are prepared to encounter a fatal accident at some time if they stick with the sport for long enough. When a jumper loses his or her life, a universal, traditional toast is given:

Blue Skies, Black Death.

________

Our episodes deal with serious and often distressing incidents. If you feel at anytime you need support, please contact your local crisis centre. Some suggestions for confidential support for men women and children:

 

AUSTRALIA:

Lifeline Crisis Support: 13 11 14

Beyond Blue: Depression and anxiety support: 1300 22 46 36

Rape & Domestic Violence Services: 1800 737 732

Men's Line: 1300 78 99 78

Headspace: Youth Mental Health Foundation: see headspace.org.au for your local centre

 

USA:

Distress &  Lifeline: 1800 273 8255

Crisis Text Line: text HOME to 741 741

Domestic Violence Helpline: 1800 799 7233

Victim Connect: support for victims of crime: 855 484 2846

 

UK:

Mind: mental health support: 0300 123 3393

SANE: mental health support: 0300 304 7000

Samaritans support network: 116 123

National Stalking Helpline: 0808 802 0300

 

CANADA:

For a list of Canadian crisis centres: https://thelifelinecanada.ca/help/call/

 

NEW ZEALAND:

Lifeline: 0800 543354

Depression Helpline: 0800 111 757 (Text 4202)

 

______

If you are hearing impaired or know someone who is and would like to get a transcript of the episode, please email us at contact@casefilepodcast.com

CREDITS

 

NARRATION:

Episode narrated by the Anonymous Host

 

EPISODE:

Episode researched and written by Eileen Ormsby

 

MUSIC:

‘Flatline intro’ and ‘Come play with me’ intro and outro www.dl-sounds.com

All other music and audio clean up performed by Mike Migas and Andrew Joslyn 

 

OTHER:

Logo design by Paulina Szymanska

 

RESEARCH

 

This episode of Casefile was researched and written by Eileen Ormsby, whose latest book The Darkest Web – Drugs, Death and Destroyed Lives: The Inside Story of the Internet’s Evil Twin is available now!

 

THIS EPISODE’S SPONSORS

 

Mafia – Brand-new podcast taking us into America’s criminal underworld

Quip – Get your first refill pack FREE with a QUIP electric toothbrush

ShipStation – Try ShipStation FREE for 30 days plus get a special bonus when you use promo code CASEFILE

Accidents are to be expected in skydiving. It is, after all, an extreme sport. Over 99% of people who jump out of an aeroplane will do it just once, attached to an instructor.

Those people are unlikely to come to any harm. They’re strapped to a professional who has performed thousands of jumps and who makes all the decisions. For the majority of participants, skydiving is a once-in-a-lifetime thrill, just a tick on a bucket list. They never do it again.

For the tiny fraction who go on to jump solo, skydiving becomes more than just a thrill. It is an obsession, a lifestyle, something they are – rather than merely something they do.

As those starting out get used to the elements of the sport – freefall, canopy flight, and landing, they are bound to experience scrapes and bruises, perhaps even a broken bone or two. Skydivers do what they can to minimise risks. They look out for each other – check their own gear and that of the people they are jumping with, looking out for anything amiss: frayed loops that may not hold a closing pin in properly, flaps that have become untucked, webbing that is wearing out.

This close-knit community is built on equal parts adrenaline and trust.

Accidents are to be expected in skydiving, but deaths are rare. Most skydivers are prepared to encounter a fatal accident at some time if they stick with the sport for long enough. When a jumper loses his or her life, a universal, traditional toast is given:

Blue Skies, Black Death.

______

Our episodes deal with serious and often distressing incidents. If you feel at anytime you need support, please contact your local crisis centre. Some suggestions for confidential support for men women and children:

 

AUSTRALIA:

Lifeline Crisis Support: 13 11 14

Beyond Blue: Depression and anxiety support: 1300 22 46 36

Rape & Domestic Violence Services: 1800 737 732

Men's Line:  1300 78 99 78

Headspace: Youth Mental Health Foundation: see headspace.org.au for your local centre

 

USA:

Distress &  Lifeline: 1800 273 8255

Crisis Text Line: text HOME to 741 741

Domestic Violence Helpline: 1800 799 7233

Victim Connect: support for victims of crime: 855 484 2846

 

UK:

Mind: mental health support: 0300 123 3393

SANE: mental health support: 0300 304 7000

Samaritans support network: 116 123

National Stalking Helpline: 0808 802 0300

 

CANADA:

For a list of Canadian crisis centres: https://thelifelinecanada.ca/help/call

 

NEW ZEALAND:

Lifeline: 0800 543354

Depression Helpline: 0800 111 757 (Text 4202)

 

______

If you are hearing impaired or know someone who is and would like to get a transcript of the episode, please email us at contact@casefilepodcast.com

CREDITS

 

NARRATION:

Episode narrated by the Anonymous Host

 

EPISODE:

Episode researched and written by Eileen Ormsby

 

MUSIC:

‘Flatline intro’ and ‘Come play with me’ intro and outro www.dl-sounds.com

All other music and audio clean up performed by Mike Migas and Andrew Joslyn 

 

OTHER:

Logo design by Paulina Szymanska

 

RESEARCH

 

This episode of Casefile was researched and written by Eileen Ormsby, whose latest book The Darkest Web – Drugs, Death and Destroyed Lives: The Inside Story of the Internet’s Evil Twin is available now!

 

THIS EPISODE’S SPONSORS

 

Mafia – Brand-new podcast taking us into America’s criminal underworld

Quip – Get your first refill pack FREE with a QUIP electric toothbrush

ShipStation – Try ShipStation FREE for 30 days plus get a special bonus when you use promo code CASEFILE

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